Mentorship and Coaching

Executive Monitoring

Shriya Sarang

22nd May'22

Executive mentoring is a type of monitoring wherein seasoned executives take on fresher, less experienced colleagues and helps them gain a better understanding of the profession and business culture. Executive mentoring offers several fundamental benefits. Employees who have been mentored are more likely to stay with a company and have higher levels of overall job satisfaction.

 

Benefits of Executive Mentoring

 

Executive mentoring may benefit a wide range of people, from young executives trying to strengthen their leadership abilities to the departing CEO of a corporation training the incoming chairman. We'll look at the differences between executive mentoring and coaching in this post, as well as the benefits of each, evaluate which is best for your company, and offer tips on how to locate the right mentor.

Executive coaches prepare you to deal with key near-term situations with increased confidence and competence. They assist you in honing leadership and management skills that have a long-term and immediate impact. The coach, your company, or an external expert may undertake a 360-degree assessment to identify needs.

 

 

Executive coaches also provide motivation, inspiration, and encouragement. They also encourage you to stick to your most important priorities and goals.

Executive coaching is focused on achieving results in a short amount of time (usually three to six months). You may decide to extend the coaching relationship when you achieve those goals by finding other areas where executive coaching may be beneficial.

Executive coaching is designed to produce optimal results in the shortest amount of time by focusing on distinct, near-term goals. Weekly or biweekly coaching sessions (by phone, virtual, or in-person) often last 30 to 90 minutes. More rigorous schedules, such as two- and three-hour sessions or day-long "shadowing" by a coach, can also be accommodated.

 

Your Business Coach

 

A client is being mentored by an executive mentor.  Executive mentorship, on the other hand, is more commonly -.

  • broader in scope

  • longer-running

  • somewhat less structured

  • and pursues a more open-ended agenda

 

Executive coaching frequently addresses the bigger picture of your life and career. Executive mentors can assist you in achieving short- and long-term goals, as well as those that are far off in the future. If executive coaching is about honing and increasing your talents, executive mentoring is about teaching knowledge about how to deploy and apply those skills.

 

Executive mentors deal with such issues as -

 

  • career satisfaction

  • professional development

  • critical life transitions

  • personal growth

  • creating executive presence

  • preparing for your next promotion

  • becoming comfortable in a new role

  • keeping life in balance

  • navigating corporate politics

  • gaining greater mastery of your leadership and management function

 

What is the difference between executive coaching and mentoring?

 

Mentoring is typically a limited endeavor that, since it is often being done as an unpaid relationship, is intended to respect the time and attention of the mentor. Executive coaching, on the other hand, is a paid relationship that is often able to go deeper into the client's challenges.

 

The Conclusion

 

 

Mentoring can assist you in growing your company by improving planning, performance, and production. It can help you expand your business networks, new opportunities, ideas, and innovative solutions for your company. Therefore, you must consider one of the two roles in the type of business mentoring that suits you the best.

 

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Shriya Sarang holds a degree in Political Science and Public Administration. Apart from having no political opinions, she advocates financial literacy among her friends. 

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